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Is A Manual 2015 Chevrolet SS Coming?

When the Chevrolet SS was first announced, I assumed that the decision between the SS and the Charger SRT8 wouldn't be difficult. Assuming no brand loyalty and narrowing your choices down to full size sedans with good ole' American muscle, the choice would come down to your driving style. The Chevy SS would be your favourite of you're more of a canyon carver and the Charger would be your choice if you wanted more of a grand tourer, judging by the fact that the Camaro is smaller and sharper than the Challenger. Chevrolet may want to give buyers another reason to consider the SS though, as Motor Trend sources report that the SS may be getting a six-speed manual transmission and magnetic ride control suspension.  Full size sedan with a V8 in the front, power going to the back and a manual transmission? Seems too good to be true. I don't know if a manual would make the car any quicker because GM builds a good auto and I believe I have read a few times that the

GM Doesn't Want You to Clone The Camaro Z/28

After Ford re-introduced the Boss 302 and Boss 302 Laguna Seca, many parts became available such as the wheels, the front splitter and more. The GT500 spoiler has long been a favourite amount many Mustang owners (myself included - I have a genuine GT500 spoiler on my Boss 302). GM doesn't want you to be able to do that, though. To prevent people from borrowing design cues or all out cloning the mighty Camaro Z/28, GM is restricting sale of 35 parts to only those who own the car.  The restricted parts include the brake callipers and carbon ceramic rotors, forged wheels, helical differential, half shafts, seats and many aerodynamic parts such as the fender flares, rocker panels, rear spoiler and more. Here is a  list of parts (courtesy of GM Authority) including part numbers: 22958646 ROTOR-FRT BRK 22958647 ROTOR-RR BRK 22958658 CALIPER ASM-FRT BRK 22958607 CALIPER ASM-FRT BRK 22958637 CALIPER ASM-RR BRK 22958634 CALIPER ASM-RR BR 23179350 MOLDING ASM-RKR PNL 231






Does An Aftermarket Grille Really Increase Airflow?
I put a Saleen S281 grille to the test to answer that question.

Stock Suspension S197 Mustang With Square 305/30/19's
What you need to fit a proper size square tire setup.

How Limited Slip Diffs Make You Faster on Track
What you need to know about how they put power down and pros and cons.

Can Telemetry Explain Schumacher's Talent?
A comparison between Schumacher's and then team mate Herbert's data.






Cayman GT4 Track Review
The first Cayman with proper (911-challenging) power.

Is an EcoBoost Mustang any good on Track?
Two days at the track in a Mustang short 4 cylinders.

2016 BMW M4 DCT Track Review
It's quick (properly quick). But is it fun?

Can a stock Golf Diesel handle a Track Day?
Not your every day track beater.




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Bridgestone Potenza RE-71R Track Review

2012 Boss 302 on square 305/30/19 RE-71R's at AMP - Graham MacNeil © For better or for worse, I have heard and read so much about RE-71R's. Everyone swears by the grip but complains about the wear. Generally speaking, the pros are: 1. They grip as well or better than most R comps. 2. They don't wear as quickly as R comps if driven occasionally on the street. 3. They work better in the rain than R comps. The cons were limited to overheating quickly when used on track (being an autocross tire) and wearing too fast on heavy cars like mine. In the popular 200 TW category, they are faster than the popular Hankook RS-4's and BFGoodrich Rival S's according to published Tire Rack Tests. According to plenty of reviews, they are also faster than well established R comps like R888R's (which don't seem to work too well on heavy cars anyway) and the venerable NT01's. But I was still hesitant for a while until I talked to a tire tech support gentleman

Michelin Pilot Super Sports vs Firestone Firehawk Indy 500 - Street Review

I've been a huge fan of Michelin PSS tires and exclusively bought them for the Mustang over the last four years. So how did I end up here? This year, I was hugely interested in trying an "R-comp" tire. I had my eyes set on Bridgestone Potenza RE-71R's for two simple reasons: price and reputation. Although not a true "R-comp" tire on paper, it performs like one by the account of every single test and review I've read (down to wear rates...). They seem like they're easily the most affordable (from a big brand) R-comp tire and combine that with a reputation for having tons of grip, it was an easy top contender. I had my concerns, though. For one, I'm told and have read that they are an autox tire, not really designed for high speed, pressure, and temps associated with open track. For another, the Mustang is a heavy car (as far as track cars are concerned) being roughly 3,800 lb. (including driver), which will amplify the unwanted open track load

Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2's vs Bridgestone Potenza RE-71R's

I never thought I'd ever run Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2's on my 2012 Boss 302. The cost is astronomical and they are supposed to last the least of anything comparable. So how did I end up with (nearly) fresh Sport Cup 2's? A complete fluke. I came across a lightly used set with only a few hundred miles and no track time; 305/30/19 takeoffs from a GT Performance Pack Level 2 (GT PPL2). I knew my 71R's were getting very worn before the season started and likely wouldn't last the whole season, even this short one. The price was far better than a new set of RE-71R's, a little more than half, and local Time Attack rules (Canadian Automobile Sport Clubs) recently made 180 and 200 TW tires equivalent, meaning no PAX or PIP point penalty for going with 180 TW tire like the Pilot Sport Cup 2's. I have been very curious about how PSC2's compare to RE 71R's but I stayed away due to their being painfully expensive and, up to last year, their 180 TW rating would

Stock Suspension S197 Mustang With Square 305/30/19's

If you've had any doubts about whether or not they will fit, fear not! You absolutely can run square 305/30/19's. I had a lot of doubts before pulling the trigger, even more so when the wheels where on the car. The tires do poke out a bit and I figured rubbing is all but guaranteed at full compression but I couldn't be happier I trusted APEX and those on here who have run it. Here's what you need: 1. Camber plates: I have MM C/C plates and they are maxed out at -2.3 deg with the stock struts. I have been running them for years with many track days without issue. 2. 1"/25 mm spacer: I have Motorsport-tech 1" spacers and they look like high quality units. There is maybe a 1/4 inch clearance in the back so you can't go any narrower than 25 mm. http://www.motorsport-tech.com/adaptec/car/ford_s and you want Design 2. Motorsport Tech 1" Mustang Hub-centric Spacers 3. Elongated studs: your best bet is to get the FPP hubs with elongated studs