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About Me


I have been writing on here for several years now and I figured I owe you all a proper introduction; a bio of sorts and a bit of background about how I got where I am now. A proper introduction starts at the beginning, of course, so that's exactly where I'll start.

The first birthday gift I can remember was a black 1:18 scale Lamborghini Countach. I was 4 at the time. While other kids collected cool bedroom wall posters, I collected model cars and raced them on the floor. The word "video game" for me was nearly synonymous with Need For Speed while I was growing up, until it turned into some sort of Fast & Furious franchise. I shifted my focus to Gran Turismo and then Forza after that. Trips to amusement parks always frustrated my friends. Everyone wanted to go and ride at least once on every fun ride. I just wanted to wait in line for go-karts all day.

By the time I was 11, I was taking my dad's 1.0 litre, 3 cylinder Opel Corsa for drives around a private industrial park... off-road, so it was technically legal. I used to find puddles of standing water so I could do burnouts. Dad wasn't happy when he found that out, in case you're curious. For as long as I can remember, I have been crazy about cars (well, the ones that matter anyway). Naturally, that meant I decided I wanted to make a living working on cars at a young age.

With a great interest in suspension and powertrain systems, I knew I wanted to become a mechanical engineer before high school. I didn't know much else at the time but that plan never changed until I graduated high school. As a result, I did end up going to university and studied mechanical engineering. I graduated in 2011 with my degree, but life called with a local job offer that I had to take. I called back, however, and said: Hey life, I'm not done with cars. I will drive, race, and write about them. I dipped my toes in high performance driving once in 2011. I was hooked. I came back a couple more times in 2012. It was nowhere near enough.



I came back every chance I got every year after that. By 2016, I was racing with a local VW race team - Vantage Motorsports; a humble but very exciting 95 GTI SCCA IT-B spec car. I shared the car with team mates who had been instructing and racing longer than I have been driving so I learned far more in a couple seasons of racing than I could have done on my own in years. By 2017, I was instructing high-performance driving. But living in Canada means there is no track for nearly 7 months out of the year during the track off-season so I’ve just picked up a car to get into Rallycross this season. Enough is just never enough if you catch the track bug and I am severely inflicted.

My personal track car is currently a 2012 Mustang Boss 302 and has been since I bought it in the summer of 2012. I’ve done a few thoughtful mods (you know the ones; camber, control arms, Watt's link, wheels & tires, etc.). This made me somewhat of a "Mustang guy," it seems, because I have had four different High Performance Driving Education (HPDE) students with Mustangs since, one with a 525 hp Saleen. None of them crashed. Everyone in the paddock was accounted for - and standing up - as those Mustangs left the track (sorry, YouTube). But actually, that last little bit speaks a lot more for those drivers’ lack of stupidity rather than my teaching or driving skills, but hey, I have a blog and they don’t, so I’ll take the credit.


I enjoy writing reviews/tests (ideally, on track), performance tech features/articles, and a bit of interesting car news. I don’t have access to manufacturers’ press fleets, so I’m at the mercy of good opportunities for test drives. Thankfully, I have good friends that let me drive interesting cars and write about them from time to time. I write about my HPDE students cars as well, if I learn enough about them in the few laps I take in each. One day, I hope to test a lot more - especially on track - with access to press fleets. I’ll also share cars and stories I come across. If you like what you find, make sure to subscribe (top of the page) and follow me on Facebook or Instagram (below). There’s always something coming!

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Comments







Does An Aftermarket Grille Really Increase Airflow?
I put a Saleen S281 grille to the test to answer that question.

Stock Suspension S197 Mustang With Square 305/30/19's
What you need to fit a proper size square tire setup.

How Limited Slip Diffs Make You Faster on Track
What you need to know about how they put power down and pros and cons.

Can Telemetry Explain Schumacher's Talent?
A comparison between Schumacher's and then team mate Herbert's data.






Cayman GT4 Track Review
The first Cayman with proper (911-challenging) power.

Is an EcoBoost Mustang any good on Track?
Two days at the track in a Mustang short 4 cylinders.

2016 BMW M4 DCT Track Review
It's quick (properly quick). But is it fun?

Can a stock Golf Diesel handle a Track Day?
Not your every day track beater.




🔥 Most Visited This Week

GTR vs Evo X vs STI: which has the best AWD system?

A few weeks ago, I made a post explaining  mainstream AWD system types and how they compare , pros and cons, etc. including some simple diagrams to show where the power goes and how much. As promised, this post will focus on specific cars and what AWD systems they use, especially ones that that have more or less been defined by their AWD systems, and the best place to start may be with a bombshell; the Nissan GT-R. Nissan GT-R (R35) The GT-R has built a reputation around having monster traction and very approachable performance, thanks to its AWD system - Advanced Total Traction Engineering System for All-Terrain (ATTESA) - and what it can do for you. But the GT-R doesn't actually use the most mechanically sophisticated type of AWD systems discussed in the previous article, namely a "true" AWD with a centre differential. Instead, it uses a clutch pack to transfer power. RWD-based clutch-type AWD schematic - Rams Eye The Track Guy © The R32, R33, and R34 Sky

Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2's vs Bridgestone Potenza RE-71R's

I never thought I'd ever run Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2's on my 2012 Boss 302. The cost is astronomical and they are supposed to last the least of anything comparable. So how did I end up with (nearly) fresh Sport Cup 2's? A complete fluke. I came across a lightly used set with only a few hundred miles and no track time; 305/30/19 takeoffs from a GT Performance Pack Level 2 (GT PPL2). I knew my 71R's were getting very worn before the season started and likely wouldn't last the whole season, even this short one. The price was far better than a new set of RE-71R's, a little more than half, and local Time Attack rules (Canadian Automobile Sport Clubs) recently made 180 and 200 TW tires equivalent, meaning no PAX or PIP point penalty for going with 180 TW tire like the Pilot Sport Cup 2's. I have been very curious about how PSC2's compare to RE 71R's but I stayed away due to their being painfully expensive and, up to last year, their 180 TW rating would

All Mainstream AWD and 4WD Systems Compared and Explained

Mitsubishi Evo X GSR at Atlantic Motorsport Park - Kevin Doubleday  © If you live in Canada or the US, you'll find that plenty of people hold sacred the terms '4x4' and '4WD' to describe a 'true 4x4', where you have a butch transfer case with a low speed, perhaps a body on frame chassis, and ideally a solid axle or two. I'm not sure how that translates to the rest of the world. My extensive research into the motoring industry in Europe (which exclusively consists of watching Top Gear and The Grand Tour...) concluded that most people across the pond simply refer to any vehicle that is capable of sending any power to all four wheels as a 4WD vehicle, further muddying the waters. Where I grew up, 4x4 was more or less synonymous with 'Jeep' so that's not much help either. However, despite all various systems attempting to do the same sort of thing - distribute power between all four wheels instead of two - not all systems are created equal,

How would a Mustang 3.5L EcoBoost compare to the 5.0L V8?

Ever wonder how a 3.5 litre EcoBoost might fair against the 5.0 litre V8 in the Mustang? Of course you have. Ever since Ford dropped it in the F150 (and perhaps well before), everyone has been wondering how it would perform. There are basically two camps; those who think it would be awesome because of tuneability and power potential and those who think it means the death of the V8 in the Mustang. If you are in the latter group, we seem to be good so far with continuous upgrades to the 5.0 litre Coyote and the brand new Shelby GT500 which still uses a supercharged V8 as it has been for over a decade and multiple iterations. But what if... Well, it seems we are closer than ever to finding out the answer to that question. American Trucks recently got together two crew cab, short box, 4x4 F150's but one has the 5.0 litre V8 and the other has the 3.5 litre EcoBoost V6. There has been a few comparisons between 5.0 litre and 3.5 litre EB F150's, but this seems to be the most di