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2016 Cadillac CT6 Surprise Unveil




In an unprecedented move, Cadillac chose to unveil a brand new car (one that is currently going to sit at the top of the lineup at that) in an Oscars commercial instead of a car show or press release. Meet the CT6, completely unveiled, although we'll have to wait until the New York Auto Show for the official debut with all the details and get a better look at it from different angles. I think it's a very smart move, capturing an unexpected moment and a lot of excitement, but only time will tell if it will pay off in sales.

I've always been a fan of Cadillac's Art and Science design language and this is no exception. I think it looks great and elegant. What's even more important to me in this segment is looking substantial but not bulky and demanding presence. I think it hits all the right marks.




As far as mechanical details, so far it's expected to receive 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 and an optional plug-in hybrid powertrain that should get about 70 mpge. It will be RWD based and should offer AWD as an option. And despite its size (measuring over 8 inches longer than a CTS and clearly wider) it will be lighter by 53 lb. so any engine that is adequate for a CTS should be adequate for this, which includes the 2.0 litre 4-cyl turbo and 3.6 naturally aspirated V6. Cadillac CEO, John de Nysschen, said in an interview that the CT6 will eventually get a very wide range of engines starting with a 2.0 litre turbo up to a high performance V8-turbo. Yes, you read that right, a turbo V8 not a supercharged one like the CTS-V. It is expected to be unique to the CT6 and should help it establish itself as a formidable competitor in the large luxury sedan segment such as the Audi S8, although I suspect its performance will be closer to the RS7.

Pricing is yet to be announced but de Nysschen previously said that the CT6 will not be halo model for long so it should be positioned lower than the Mercedes S-Class, Audi A8 and BMW 7-series. I would expect prices to start somewhere in the $60,000-$70,000 range. I think it will be an instant hit among reviewers like the ATS and CTS and will probably be several hundred lbs. lighter than the competition. Whether it will convince large German luxury sedan buyers to go to Cadillac, though is a different story. Here's hoping Cadillac will be successful! Check out the full commercial below.




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