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2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Pricing - Starts at $51,995




The C7 Corvette Stingray was revealed last January but Chevrolet had yet to announce pricing until a few days ago. MSRP for the coupe will be $51,995 and $56,995 for the convertible, including $995 destination fee. The current but outgoing (C6) Corvette has an MSRP of $50,595 for the coupe and $55,595 for the convertible, including $995 destination fee. This means a price bump of $1,400 for both body styles but you get a lot for the $1,400.

All Stingrays will come standard with "exceptional" seating support, a great improvement over the current one. The seats feature 8-way power adjustment and a lightweight magnesium frame. Other noticeable standard features include:

  • Five-position Drive Mode Selector
  • 7-speed manual transmission with Active Rev Matching
  • The all-new 6.2 litre LT1 small block V8 with direct injection, Active Fuel Management, continuously variable valve timing and an advanced combustion system
  • Carbon fibre hood on all models and removable roof panel on coupes
  • Aluminum frame that's 99 lb. lighter and 57% stiffer than the outgoing (C6) model
  • HID and LED lighting
  • Dual, 8-inch configurable driver/infotainment screens, with Chevrolet MyLink infotainment system and rear vision camera
  • Bose 9-speaker audio system with SiriusXM Satellite radio, Bluetooth connectivity, USB and SD card and auxiliary input jack
  • Keyless access with push-button start
  • power tilt and telescope steering wheel
  • Fully electronic top on the convertible that can be lowered remotely using the key fob

If you've got a little extra cash and want to include the goodies shown at the North American International Auto Show, it'll cost you $73,360. The options include:

  • 3LT interior package, with leather-wrapped interior - $8,005
  • Z51 Performance Package - $2,800
  • Competition sports seats - $2,495
  • Exposed carbone fibre roof panel - $1,995
  • Magnetic Ride Control with Performance Traction Management - $1,795
  • Dual-mode exhaust system - $1,195
  • Carbon fibre interior trim - $995
  • Sueded, microfiber-wrapped upper interior trim - $995
  • Red-painted calipers - $595
  • Black-painted wheels - $495

The interior package includes an upgraded Bose surround-sound audio system with 10 speakers (up from the standard 9 speakers), one-year subscription for SiriusXM and an HD radio receiver, colour head-up display, memory package, navigation system, heating and ventilated seats with power lumbar and bolster adjustment, premium Napa leather seating surfaces and a leather-wrapped dash, instrument panel, console and door panels. 

If all you care about is bang for your buck, then skip all the options except the Z51 Performance Package. Ticking this option box will upgrade just about every aspect except the engine, although it does get an upgraded, dry sump oiling system. The transmission gets a more performance-oriented gear ratios (probably a closer ratio gearbox) and a transmission-cooling system. Wheels and tires are replaced by larger, 19-inch front and 20-inch rear wheels and tires. Brakes are upgraded with larger, slotted rotors and brake cooling ducts. The differential is replaced with an electronic limited-slip unit to better put the power down and a differential cooling system is added for tough track duty. Unique chassis tuning rounds off the upgrades and makes the most out of all the other improvements. Equipped with the Z51 package, the Corvette Stingray is capable of reaching 60 mph in under 4 seconds and pulling more than 1 g in cornering. Magnetic Ride Control active-handling system with Performance Traction Management is also available with the Z51 package but it isn't clear whether it will be available as a stand-alone option. 

All these upgrades are great, but looking at pricing makes it even better (for more information about the Stingray Corvette and upgrades over the C6 Corvette, visit: The Stingray is back! Details about the new 2014 C7 Corvette). At the reveal of the Corvette Stingray, GM said that the base Stingray is already quicker than the current C6 Corvette Grand Sport. Assuming you need the Z51 package to make the Stingray quicker than the current Corvette Grand Sport, that would come to a total of $54,795, which is $2,200 less than the current Grand Sport. You get better performance and higher quality than the current car but you pay less for it! Chevrolet also announced that there will be an even more affordable Corvette, the Corvette Coupe (no Stingray - full post: Can't afford a Stingray? Get a Corvette Coupe!). Considering how closely priced the Stingray and the C6 Corvette are, there's even a chance that the more affordable Corvette will cost the same or ring in a little lower than the current base C6 Corvette and still be better. It sounds like Chevy knocked it out of the park with this one!

Source: Chevrolet


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