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2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Test Numbers




This isn't "A Closer Look". I don't have a second opinion, criticism or a different view. I simply have to include the performance numbers of a new Corvette Z06. Especially when they're blistering. 0-60 mph in 3.0 seconds. 3 seconds flat. From a front (mid) engine, RWD car with a starting price under $80,000. With a manual, this number drops to 3.2 seconds. The full acceleration numbers are:

0-30 mph (auto/manual): 1.3 sec/1.5 sec
0-40 mph (auto/manual): 1.7 sec/2.1 sec
0-50 mph (auto/manual): 2.3 sec/2.6 sec
0-60 mph (auto/manual): 3.0 sec/3.2 sec
0-70 mph (auto/manual): 3.8 sec/4.1 sec
0-80 mph (auto/manual): 4.7 sec/4.9 sec
0-90 mph (auto/manual): 5.6 sec/5.9 sec
0-100 mph (auto/manual): 6.8 sec/7.2 sec
1/4 mile (auto/manual): 11.1 sec @ 127 mph/11.3 sec @ 126 mph




It is worth mentioning that the numbers were recorded by different sources. Car and Driver tested the automatic and Motor Trend tested the manual but the gap makes sense so take that for what it's worth. Handling shouldn't be different between the manual and the auto. Braking from 60 mph to 0 took just 91 ft. Braking from 70 mph took 128 ft. That's just mind boggling compared to cars either magazine have been testing.

Motor Trend got 94 ft from 60 mph from a Porsche 918 Spyder. Average lateral g was 1.12 g for the 918 Spyder. For the Z06? 1.16 g. The only handling number that's lower for the Corvette is Motor Trend's figure eight which was 22.2 sec @ 1.06 g average for the 918 Spyder and 22.5 sec @ 0.98 g average. Remember, though, the Porsche has a 237 hp advantage. Randy Pobst said that the Corvette's chassis could use another 100 hp. With another hp, you can look for that figure eight to be even tighter. Still, the 22.5 sec time makes it the second fastest ever, only after the hyper fast 918 Spyder. 




The reviews from both magazines are filled with comments about it being incredibly fast, stable, and easy to drive. It comes with an automatic. It comes as a convertible without a performance penalty. For a purist, that's blasphemy. But as an accomplishment, it's astonishing. 

The only thing you could complain about is that it weighs 3,533 lb which is nudging 4 seater territory of this caliber but how can you complain when the numbers are that fast? I have recently learned that an electronic differential can be over 60 lb heavier than a Torsen limited slip differential because of all the clutches and motors (Source: Car and Driver on the Lexus RC F). Chevy also says that, with the third stage aero package, it produces more downforce than any other car they have ever tested including Porsche 911 Turbo S, Ferrari 458 and McLaren 12C and I'm sure the aero components add a few pounds. I would like it, though, if GM did a more focused version without the luxuries like heated and cooled seats, WiFi, and many others that I'm sure the Vette has.

The standard Corvette with the Z51 package already stunned me at Car and Driver's Lightning Lap 2014 with a lap time of just 2:53.8. I have no doubt that this car will be well within the 2:40's at next year's Lightning Lap, probably with a lap time in the 2:45 to 2:48 range. I can't wait to see it. Ford cannot come back with a new Ford GT soon enough! For full test reviews, here are links to tests done by Motor Trend (manual) and Car and Driver (auto).


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